My mom’s minestrone soup is perfect for the frigid temperatures we are experiencing lately.   The origins of this soup date back to 2nd Century BC Rome. This dish takes a page right out of the “cucina povera” (literally “poor kitchen”) cookbook. To this day this soup is called “the poor man’s soup”, because peasants would traditionally put whatever leftover ingredients they had into it.  This  explains why no one exact recipe is the same.

My mom’s version not only includes so many delicious vegetables, but chickpeas and red kidney beans to give it some extra protein.  I can remember walking in the house as a kid from school and smelling this soup on the stove.  It was one of my favorite things to eat.  It just warms your soul.  

Minestrone Soup

3/4 Cups Extra Virgin Olive Oil

2 Onions – Diced

8 Celery Stalks – diced

1 lb. (about 8 large) Carrots – Diced

2 (400g) Cans of Cherry Tomatoes or 1 (28 oz) Can of Whole Tomatoes- Pureed

2 (32 oz) – Beef Broth

1 (32oz.) – Vegetable Broth

1 Cup of String Beans trimmed and cut into ¼ inch pieces

3 tsp. Salt

3 tsp. Pepper

2 Potatoes (I use Idaho) – Cut in ¼ inch cubes

1 Yellow Squash – Diced

3 Zucchini – Diced

2 19 oz. Cans of Chickpeas

2 19 oz. Cans Red Kidney Beans

1 lb of Ditalini Pasta or the pasta of your choice

 

Heat the olive oil in a pot on a low flame and add the onions.  Sautee for 5 minutes and then add the carrots and the celery.  Saute for another 10 minutes until the veggies start to get soft. Add the pureed tomatoes and cook for about 10 minutes on low. Add the beef and the vegetable broth. Raise the temperature to medium and bring to a slight boil.  Add the string beans and season with salt and pepper.  Cook for 5 minutes and add the potatoes.  Boil for 10 minutes and add the yellow squash and zucchini.  Cook for 5 minutes.  Drain a little of the liquid off the top of each can of beans.  Pour the chickpeas and the red kidney beans in the pot.  Cook the soup on low for about 2 hours.  Boil the pasta and serve with the soup.

NOTE: This soup serves 12. Even if you don’t need to feed this many people, this soup  freezes really well.

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